The Accidental Protected Bike Lane

Toronto officials unintentionally created a protected bike lane just by adding some planters as part of a temporary pedestrian project. Photo: I Bike TO
Toronto officials unintentionally created a protected bike lane just by adding some planters as part of a temporary pedestrian project. Photo: I Bike TO

While protected bike lanes are being adopted by many American cities, in some places local officials still contend that these street redesigns are just too difficult to implement. But how hard is it to set aside street space where people feel comfortable biking?

Cyclists don’t seem to understand that this space wasn’t intended for them. Photo: I Bike TO
Cyclists don’t seem to understand that this space wasn’t intended for them. Photo: I Bike TO

Sometimes you don’t even have to try. Herb at I Bike TO has the story today about a protected bike lane that Toronto officials created entirely by accident:

Max snapped this photo one morning a few weeks ago at John and Queen, looking north. I was completely flabbergasted at first. As many of my readers might now, there was a long extended fight with Councillor Vaughan and a bunch of planners who were trying to plan cyclists out of the picture and create a pedestrian arcade (but with cars) out of John Street. This seemed like a complete 180, where cyclists were actually given their own space instead of treated like pariahs.

But, no, it was not to be. Instead this is a pilot project until October to carve out a much larger pedestrian zone with a row of planters. Instead of being a protected bike lane much like I’ve seen in Vancouver, it’s a “pedestrian” zone.

Cyclists don’t know what to do with the space. Some people are still using it as a bike lane while other cyclists choose to squeeze next to a multi-block long line of cars (photo by Michal).

Herb is disappointed the city didn’t include protected bike lanes in the street reconfiguration. Will the final design discourage cycling, or will it be flexible like the temporary project?

Elsewhere on the Network today: Systemic Failure scoffs at the news that a Hawaii father has been convicted of child endangerment for making his son walk a mile home from school. Bike Portlandconsiders the significance of the fact that “America’s bike capital” has no elected officials who commute by bike. And ATL Urbanist shares some photos showing how parking devoured Atlanta’s walkable urban fabric in the 20th century.

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In Austin, a Protected Bike Lane Built to Help Kids Get to School

The Bluebonnet protected bike lane in Austin serves children riding to Zilker Elementary. Photo: People for Bikes
The Bluebonnet protected bike lane in Austin serves children riding to Zilker Elementary. Photo: People for Bikes

What does it look like when a city gets serious about giving kids the freedom to get to school on their own? Austin, Texas, is showing people what’s possible with a protected bike lane that serves an elementary school. Continue reading

What’s the carbon footprint of … a new car?

Making a new car creates as much carbon pollution as driving it, so it’s often better to keep your old banger on the road than to upgrade to a greener model.

• More carbon footprints: nuclear war, cycling a mile, more
Understand more about carbon footprints

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The carbon footprint of a new car:
6 tonnes CO2e: Citroen C1, basic spec
17 tonnes CO2e: Ford Mondeo, medium spec
35 tonnes CO2e: Land Rover Discovery, top of the range Continue reading

DC Bike Counts Show Continuing Surge in Protected Lane Use

Pennsylvania Avenue uses a combination of buffered and protected bike lanes. Photo credit: PeopleforBikes
Pennsylvania Avenue uses a combination of buffered and protected bike lanes. Photo credit: PeopleforBikes

The older DC’s first two protected bike lanes get, the more spectacular their results seem to become.

Freshly compiled bike counts from June 2013 show that the number of people biking in the 15th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue lanes during peak hours has grown seven times faster than the citywide average since April 2010. Continue reading

What a Great Pilot Bike Lane Project Looks Like: 3 Best Practices

Cheap and flexible: A pilot protected lane project on Multnomah Street in Portland. Photo: Green Lane Project

Cheap and flexible: A pilot protected lane project on Multnomah Street in Portland. Photo: Green Lane Project

From Calgary to Seattle to Memphis, the one-year pilot project is becoming the protected bike lane trend of 2014.

Street designers looking to use the design have been putting down their digital renderings and picking up plastic posts and barrels of paint, city staffers from around the country said in interviews this week. Continue reading

Documentary to Explore Racial Discrimination in Transportation Planning

Beavercreek, Ohio, nabbed its own infamous place in civil rights history last year, when the Federal Highway Administration ruled that the suburb had violated anti-discrimination laws by blocking bus service from nearby Dayton. Continue reading

Mary Beth Kelly on NYC’s 25 mph Speed Limit (Families for Safe Streets)

A few days prior to a 25 mph speed limit becoming law in New York City, Mary Beth Kelly, one of the members of Families for Safe Streets, shares her views on how she would like to see driver’s attitudes change to make the city safer for everyone. Continue reading

Навчання безпечній їзді для шкіл

Terenowe zajęcia z bezpiecznej jazdy rowerem dla szkół — fotorelacja i zaproszenie

Już w najbliższy piątek Porozumienie Rowerowe rozpoczyna kolejną serię terenowych zajęć z bezpiecznej jazdy rowerem skierowaną do uczniów szkół podstawowych i ponadpodstawowych. Po raz pierwszy dotychczasowe zajęcia zostaną rozszerzone o część teoretyczną przy szkole, obejmującą sprawdzenie stanu technicznego roweru, wyposażenia oraz przećwiczenia podstawowych manewrów tj. skręcanie, hamowanie i jazda w kolumnie, przed wyjechaniem na ulice miasta. Zapraszamy także do obejrzenia fotorelacji, przedstawiającej zdjęcia z dotychczas przeprowadzonych zajęć w terenie. Continue reading

Велосипедні гори Копенгагена

Ця стаття — чудовий приклад, як велосипедистів у всьому намагаються звинувачувати. Бо насправді проблема велосипедних гор не у велосипедистах, а в тім, що архітектори, планувальники й працедавці ігнорують і зневажають потребу людей у місці зберігання велосипедів... Однак ні, в усьому все одне винні саме велосипедисти з їньою велосипедизацією...

Копенгаген — одне з найкращих міст у світі для велосипедистів. Але є й зворотна сторона медалі — тисячі велосипедів, припаркованих посеред вулиць. Іноді ситуація виходить з-під контролю. Continue reading